• What is PlanMixPlay?

    • A multi-touch audio and video live performance instrument

    • Designed for 32 inch+ touch surfaces

    • Live audience social integration

    • Used in over 75+ live shows

    • Filled with love

  • HangTheDJ using an early prototype build of PlanMixPlay
    PlanMixPlay at the first ever 'Prototype Party' in Roppongi, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Captivated crowd at the 'Prototype Party'.
    Captivated crowd at the 'Prototype Party'. The projection display in the background.

2018 comes to a close
Saturday December 22, 2018

This year seems to have passed even faster than the one that preceded it. It's been the year of my online streaming comeback and so far I'm fairly content with the result. If there's anything to be discontent about, it's perhaps the speed at which PlanMixPlay progresses. There's absolutely no lack of ideas and features I'd like to cram in there at the push of a button, but alas, it's also important to be able to prioritize.

I feel this is something I'm not great at, but hopefully getting better.

It's no secret that I've long wanted to get PlanMixPlay out in-front of an actual crowd, and while it's still not quite ready, I think 2019 might actually be the year I have not only my next prototype party, but perhaps even a proper live local show. Time will tell. But although progress has felt slow, it's been a steady slow. I try my best to balance my time between the actual live show I've started doing again on SlayRadio, as well as getting PlanMixPlay feature ready for a proper live show. A few recent upgrades that I recall would include...

On the application PlanMixPlay:

  • Basic audio spectrum analysis now supported
  • Basic visualizer utilizing spectrum analysis created
  • Updated most visualizers to run in native 1080p
  • C-64 console output now supports color
  • A single emoji (heart) supported via chat

On the website - PlanMixPlay.com:

  • Partially fixed YouTube videos not being properly tied to completed shows. Given the sheer size of YouTube, it's not surprising that their system takes a little while (+5 mins perhaps?) to expose a new video via their API. Unfortunately, the previous code was fairly overzealous in trying to prevent needless quota calls - meaning if it doesn't absolutely have to poll YouTube, it doesn't. So the site only polled YouTube if SlayRadio.org informed PlanMixPlay.com that a show had recently ended. SlayRadio - being quite timely to do this - lead to PlanMixPlay.com querying YouTube.com for the completed show, before it was ever properly published. Although the window within which PlanMixPlay.com polls YouTube has been widened, there's still something off, as a recent show has yet to be properly tied to its associated video.
  • Fixed PlanMixPlay.com immediately reverting back to a non-show state if the show's a bit late. As exceedingly professional as the show is, it does happen, on occasion, once in a blue moon, that it's a little late. Previously, once we'd pass the official time of commencement, PlanMixPlay.com would revert back to just showing the regular (no active show) site. Any newcomers would be thoroughly confused by this, as even the 'upcoming shows' would no longer display the (almost begun) show, so it'd be as if it never happened. Now there's a bit of a window to allow for irregular starting times.
  • Minor user-friendly polish. Tweaked a few details such as showing the show title, on the site, as well as auto-refreshing the browser if the show is late.

Last, but certainly not least, I want to thank everyone who's bothered to give me their attention, as well as provided feedback.

Happy holidays and a happy new year!


A wild show appears
Monday September 10, 2018

You used listen. It's super effective!

Turns out, watch is also super effective.

This Sunday around noon in Europe, or about 8pm around these parts!

So why now, and why so late?

Well here's the skinny. My ISP's been sick. Throwing up all over the place, unable to keep anything down really. In short - I've never quite tried anything like it. Since the 11th of July my connection started exhibiting packet loss left and right. At first it was intermittent. Eventually it progressed into full-blown constant full-on packet loss.

Friends and family will hopefully agree that I am a patient man. Perhaps too patient.

I'd like to lead upfront by saying my ISP is/was clearly a family business. The upside of a small ISP is that their support is generally easier to deal with if you've got some basic computer skills. I.e. you'll not first have to wade through multiple tiers of support before finally getting to a person who can do more than ask you to turn off/on various pieces of hardware.

An example of this upside is when I was having issues broadcasting my stream to SlayRadio way back when I started trying to do shows here down-under. They actually got in touch with Slaygon (who runs SlayRadio) and did some troubleshooting directly with him. Try doing that with any other ISP. Admittedly, 99% of the time the problem won't be with the ISP, but on the off-chance that it is, you can count your blessings when you're not dealing with a massive corporation.

The downside of a smaller ISP is that their tools may be limited and the sheer manpower they have is also strongly capped. This I unfortunately experience in spades towards the 'end'.

I think it took my ISP about two weeks to even confirm the issue was not on my end. Then some ideas were hatched and attempts were made, none of which ultimately resolved the issue. I think that stretched over 2-3 weeks. At this stage my ISP seemed convinced it was likely their supplier (OptiComm) who was the source of the issue, perhaps even some hardware in my apartment supplied by OptiComm.

It took about another week to get a tech to show up from their supplier (we're now about 6 weeks in for those keeping count), only to confirm that the problem was indeed with my ISP and not OptiComm. Sigh. I was promised a solution within a week (more or less), and instead the ISP basically went belly up.

Sufficed to say, I am now with a new ISP. Despite the unbelievably poor service I was offered towards the end, I still appreciated when my old ISP was 'working'.

All that is old news now and I'm glad my connection has finally stabilized the point of doing shows again. So hopefully I'll see you all this Sunday!


Incremental progress and streaming into the void
Sunday July 22, 2018

All zero of you are probably wondering what the heck is going on. It's been just about a month since the first test show was completed, and there's been a couple more since and yet still no firm date on a proper show. I can practically hear the tumbleweed using its mighty heft on my front door, trying to move just a molecule or two.

Honestly, I (and you perhaps, too) know that my audience size is minuscule, which might cause you to wonder why I bother spending easily 30 minutes putting together these posts. I've occasionally wondered that myself. But not so much why I do it, but rather why others would, and more in the form of why people bother broadcasting themselves to an audience of zero for hours on end.

But before we get to that point, let's first tackle the show for which this non-existent audience clamors. In short, things have actually progressed really well, I am literally on the brink of setting a first show date. Then I started running into internet connectivity issues. You may, or may not, know that internet access in Australia is generally a bit dodgy at best. In fact, I'd say it's a rarity to have the type of connection I do - almost a kind privilege. Make no mistake, I do pay top dollar for it, and it's about high time that I put it to good use. So just as all the pieces were coming together, I started experiencing significant packet loss (~ 15-25%) to effectively all websites. It's been tricky to nail down the exact cause. While the issue persisted for over a week, it now seems to have evaporated. Only to return, and then disappear again over the course of another day. Given that I intend to announce my official comeback show with at least a weeks worth of warning, I'm wary of doing so before I've raised my confidence that the issues I experienced will not soon return.

So I'll be monitoring how my internet connection keeps up over the coming days. There's little else I can do at this stage other than possibly trying to provoke the issue to return which I am two minds about. Hopefully next week will yield some clarity. One positive side-effect to this frustrating intermittent internet outage is that it's encouraged me to pack in another feature into PlanMixPlay before it's proper first use. More on that, during the actual first show.

This brings us around to the second topic of this post, my lovely small audience. As previously linked, the verge recently put out an interesting article on the matter. The concept of streaming to an audience of nobody. While I believe that a significant amount of persistent streamers will eventually find some kindred spirits to join them as an audience member, the vast majority of streamers will never hit a critical mass enabling them to make a living off it. Attention is a finite resource and there are simply too many takers and not enough givers. Simple as that. Doesn't matter if this 'pioneering days'-like rush to get noticed will generally raise the bar on the quality that gets filtered through, the vast majority will still not get to a self-sustaining level.

But everybody starts somewhere. Yours truly included. Every indicator in my opinion points at this endeavor of mine remaining a personal hobby. It must also be regarded as such to certain extent in my opinion. I.e. a balance between work and pleasure must be kept. These past months I've been dedicating the vast majority of my free time to pushing the project forward, but I can generally say that I do derive pleasure from it. I've no doubt that it's a similar appeal to most streamers. Playing video-games itself is fun. Doing it to an audience is also quite pleasant. Put the two together and how could you lose? If it doesn't work out in the long run, you've still had fun along the way. Maybe.

That's the point I'm getting to. I've not streamed any sort of gaming content for any significant length of time, nor do I personally know anyone well who does. But I still think I'm more than capable of making a number of assumptions about it nonetheless. The general sentiment from all the articles I read emphasize the sheer grind necessary to claw your way out of the initial zero hole. It sounds daunting. I'm sure it is actually doubly so. So much that I'm certain fun is left far behind by the time most people hit 1, 5, 10, or god forbid even 100 concurrent viewers.

I'll admit, I have no idea where the magical threshold to self-sustaining streaming lies. One thousand viewers? Five thousand? The exact number doesn't really matter to be honest. What matters to me is that while the exact number remains a mystery, one thing I know for certain is that it lies far beyond the sign that clearly says, 'The fun stops here'.